Mark Sanford Will Be President Trump’s Republican challenger

2020 Breaking News Conservative Election Mark Sanford President Republicans

Washington (AFP) – Mark-Sanford Former Republican governor Mark Sanford, former Governor of South Carolina, announced Sunday he is entering the race for his party’s presidential nomination, in a long-shot challenge to President Donald Trump. This may be challenging as 3 states have cancelled their Republican primary elections.

Mark Sanford Former Governor Announces Presidential Run

Sanford, who would be the third Republican to mount a primary bid against Trump, said he had decided to run because of the “astounding” debt and deficits piled up during his presidency. President Trump has increased the defecate more than he had promised in his campaign. This has helped the economy grow across the board.

“I think as a Republican party we have lost our way,” he said in an interview with “Fox News Sunday.”

“The president has called himself the king of debt, has a familiarity and comfort level with debt that I think ultimately is leading us in the wrong direction.” says Sanford.

Sanford’s decision comes amid reports that Republican officials in some states, including his home state of South Carolina as well as Nevada and Arizona, are considering canceling their 2020 primaries. Update: These 3 states have confirmed they will not be holding primary elections.

Asked whether he really thought he could defeat Trump, Sanford replied: “I’m saying, you never know.”

“I’m listing my goals, my primary goals to say let’s go out and force, or try and create a conversation on that which is not being talked about in this presidential cycle,” he said.

Mark Sanford Announced He Is Challening T

“The thing that has been lacking in this debate has been an earnest and real conversation on debt and deficits in government spending.”

Sanford was governor of South Carolina from 2003 to 2011, and served two separate stints in the House of Representatives, but lost a party primary in 2018.

Also running against Trump for the Republican nomination are Joe Walsh, a former Tea Party firebrand who served a single term in Congress, and William Weld, a former Massachusetts governor.

The Republican parties in South Carolina and Nevada announced Saturday that they would not be holding their presidential nominating contests in 2020, and all Republican delegates will be committed to President Trump.

They join the Kansas Republican Party, which confirmed on Friday that it will not hold its caucuses in 2020. 

States have until October to submit their delegate selection rules to the Republican National Committee, and several more state Republican parties could vote to cancel their nominating contests before the deadline. 

The move is not unprecedented and has happened in the past for incumbent parties. In 2004, ten states cancelled their nominating contests to support President George W. Bush. It is a way for the parties to save money and focus on the better bet in the incumbent president as the odds are much greater for an incumbent president to win the national election.

In many cases, the state party has to pay to hold its primaries or caucuses, so if there is an incumbent with considerable support, then the party is inclined not to incur the costs of putting on an expensive primary. According to a Nevada GOP spokesperson, the state party would save nearly $150,000 if it cancels the caucuses for the 2020 cycle.

Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel told CBS News last week that the Republican National Committee does not dictate whether the state parties should hold nominating contests. That decision is left to the states. However, Mr. Trump’s re-election campaign has dispatched its delegate staff to many of the GOP state conventions where they have observed chair elections and advised on delegate selection rules. 

The long shot Republican challengers to Mr. Trump have voiced concern over the process. But there is most likely nothing will change by 2020.

Former Congressman Joe Walsh’s presidential campaign sent letters to all four early-voting states requesting instructions for ballot access, and in a tweet this week Walsh said cancelling primaries “is what a political party does when it serves a King.”

Bill Weld in May told CBS News that he was not having discussions with the state parties. 

“Why would I talk to the state parties?” Weld responded when asked if he was trying to get ballot access in early-voting states. He added, “They’re all run by Trump people.”

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About the author: Republican
As a Republican I am a conservative but have a little libertarian leanings. I about 80% a Trump supporter. I agree with him most of the time but as I am a person that thinks for himself I don't go along with him just because he is the President. I am not like liberals that think their candidates are Gods and never wrong.
Republican avatar
Republican

As a Republican I am a conservative but have a little libertarian leanings. I about 80% a Trump supporter. I agree with him most of the time but as I am a person that thinks for himself I don't go along with him just because he is the President. I am not like liberals that think their candidates are Gods and never wrong.