Colorado

Colorado’s Political Ideologies: Are They More Liberal or Conservative? More Democrat or Republican?

Colorado’s Political Ideologies: Are They More Liberal or Conservative?

Like the rest of the country Colorado is is changing politically. Once a strong republican state they have leaned more left in recent year. Leaning more Democrat than Republican. Colorado still has areas that are very conservative and Republican. Then other areas are more liberal and Democrat.

Colorado has seen a shift in political ideology over the past 40 years. The percentage of registered Republicans in Colorado dropped by 10.1 percent in 2018. Some areas are more Democratic and Conservative and others are more Democrat and Conservative. The University of Colorado Denver and the University of Northern Colorado often rank at the top of U.S. News and World Report’s annual ratings of the best liberal arts colleges. The state has the most registered voters of any state in the country, topping Idaho by 2.5 percentage points.

What is the Political Ideology of Colorado?

On the whole the question remains no real easy answer. The map below shows Colorado’s Congressional Districts by the 2016 Presidential election turnout. The thickest blue colored areas had a higher turnout of registered voters then the surrounding areas. source: USA PoliticsNow.com The data above indicates that overall most of Colorado leans left. However there are many different districts that have much more conservative leanings. On the flip side Colorado’s west side leans heavily republican. Many counties in the far eastern portion of the state are solidly Republican with areas in the west leaning more liberal. What do you think? Do you think Colorado has a moderate politics or a more liberal politics?

What are the political parties in Colorado?

Each party has its own values and ideas about what’s best for the nation and the people living in the state. It’s up to you to make your political decisions based on your values, you individual beliefs and opinions.

Denver, Colorado’s liberal city.

The University of Colorado Denver and the University of Northern Colorado often rank at the top of U.S. News and World Report’s annual ratings of the nation’s best liberal arts colleges. The flagship campus, The University of Colorado, also is one of the most popular in the country, with 26,000 undergraduates and 23,000 graduate students. But the leftward tilt is evident in two things. First, the student body tends to skew young and female. Many hail from the liberal Bay Area. Second, and perhaps more surprising, there is a very wide divide among student on campus between conservatives and liberals. The Denver Post ran a poll looking at political ideology of students. The results were, well, interesting. Over half were liberal, though not uniformly. Just over a third were moderate.

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Colorado’s Changing Political Ideologies

Currently the most populous state in the Rocky Mountain Region, Colorado has become an outlier to the rest of the nation. This state has seen a shift in political ideology over the past 40 years and continues to do so. Following a trend set by the rest of the nation, the percentage of registered Republicans in Colorado dropped by 10.1 percent in 2018. Meanwhile, Democrats now outnumber Republicans by six percentage points. Colorado also has more unaffiliated voters than registered Republicans or Democrats. By the 2010 Census, Democrats were the only political party in Colorado to have more registered voters than Republicans. Colorado now has the most unaffiliated voters of any state in the country, topping Idaho by 2.5 percentage points.

The Political Climate of Colorado

Some areas are more Democratic and Conservative and others are more Democrat and Conservative. The main difference seems to be economic and unemployment. In regions with high unemployment and/or low education levels, the likelihood that a voter will support a Democratic candidate tends to increase, while residents in areas with lower unemployment and/or higher levels of education tend to become more Republican. 2nd District All of our four districts are swing districts. This report considers the 2nd District to be an example of a swing district in Colorado. This district has been considered to be one of the most likely to turn blue. For most of the 2016 election Colorado was considered to have been a battleground state between the Democratic and Republican party.

What is the political ideology in Colorado?

Here’s a look at Colorado’s political ideologies according to the Public Religion Research Institute. Are Colorado’s Political Ideologies More Liberal or Conservative? Did the average Colorado voter really want to go with this? What do you think?

Why has Colorado shifted more to the left than the right?

Click here to read the full article from U.S. News and World Report.

What does this mean for Colorado and its voters?

Guess it depends on who you ask. This map shows how liberal or conservative a part of the state is Source: Huffington Post These two maps show the same information, except the color scale is reversed.

About the author: Evergreen Colorado
Evergreen, CO is a little mountain town just outside of Denver. Sitting at about 7500'. Evergreen is surrounded by thousands of acres of land in the Denver Mountain Parks and Jefferson County Open Space park systems. The Denver Mountain Parks in the area are Bergen Park, Corwina Park, Dedisse Park, Dillon Park, Fillius Park, O'Fallon Park and Pence Park in Indian Hills. The Jefferson County Open Space Parks are Alderfer/Three Sisters, Elk Meadow, Lair o' the Bear, and Mount Falcon Park in Indian Hills. Hiwan Golf Club, a country club located just east of Bergen Park, is Evergreen's only country club. Popular both in the summer and the winter, Evergreen Lake and its "Lake House" are recreational focal points for the region.

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