Alabama football players march for equality ends at the spot where Blacks were told they weren’t welcome years ago

Alabama football players march for equality ends at the spot where Blacks were told they weren’t welcome years ago

A march for equality Monday organized by University of Alabama football players ended at the spot on campus where then-Gov. George Wallace stood to block Black students from entering in 1963.
“We walked to this little house door intentionally, because while much has changed in the last 57 years, too many things have not,” Alabama running back Najee Harris told the crowd, wearing a “Defend Black Lives” T-shirt.
Droves of young people marched, bearing “Black Lives Matter” banners and signs.
The event comes amid the civil unrest that’s rocked the country since George Floyd’s death during an arrest in Minnesota in May, with protests against racial injustice taking place daily in places like Portland, Oregon, and Kenosha, Wisconsin, where Jacob Blake was shot seven times by police.

A Republican student group at Arizona State University is raising money for the legal defense of the Kenosha shooting suspect

A Republican student group at Arizona State University is raising money for the legal defense of the Kenosha shooting suspect

Police have named the 17-year-old Rittenhouse as a suspect in a shooting during protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin, last week that left two people dead and a third person seriously wounded.
Rittenhouse now faces homicide charges as well as a felony charge for attempted homicide, court records show.
Republicans United, which split from the ASU College Republicans chapter in 2018, said it will donate the money to efforts to help defend Rittenhouse who the group says was “protecting his life and (shot) three attackers.”
“Kenosha has devolved into anarchy because the authorities in charge of the city abandoned it,” the group says on its website. “They stood back and watched Kenosha burn. Kyle Rittenhouse is not a vigilante but a citizen who attempted to help in a city in chaos.”

Meet the NYC artist chronicling the coronavirus pandemic by sketching people wearing masks on the subway

Meet the NYC artist chronicling the coronavirus pandemic by sketching people wearing masks on the subway

An artist who used his talent to cope with the coronavirus pandemic is now documenting history with his art for a new series he’s called the “Covid mask subway drawings.”

Written by By Alaa Elassar

One of Rodriguez' Covid mask subway drawings.

One of Rodriguez’ Covid mask subway drawings. Credit: Courtesy Devon Rodriguez

Everyday for almost a month, Devon Rodriguez has spent hours taking random trips on the subway in search of the perfect muse. When he finds someone, he uses a sketchbook and lead holder to bring them to life on paper without missing a detail from the creases in their mask to the curls in their hair.

“The subway has been a subject of mine for several years now,” Rodriguez, 24, told CNN. “Faces are a thing that I’m so used to capturing on the subway and now most of them are covered up with the Covid masks. I think it’s interesting to capture this devastating moment in time with art. It’ll reflect 2020 when I look back on them in the future. It’ll be interesting to capture the different types of masks people wear and how they wear them.

A 10-year-old Ohio boy has raised over $315,000 to provide bulletproof vests for police dogs

A 10-year-old Ohio boy has raised over $315,000 to provide bulletproof vests for police dogs

He had been watching a show with his family almost two years ago when he noticed the K-9 wasn’t as protected as his handler.
“We were watching the show together and I didn’t even notice that the dog wasn’t wearing a vest,” Leah Tornabene, Brady’s mom, told CNN.
“I was quite surprised that a child at age eight could recognize that there was an issue there, and that he could find a solution to fix that problem. It made me very proud to see him doing this.”

How schools are running gym class in pandemic times

How schools are running gym class in pandemic times

Since the school shutdown this spring, students have taken part in a modified physical education class with the help of a special deck of cards. Dubbed “Super Fitness Fun Cards,” the deck is comprised of cards with different exercises on each one: push-ups, squats and crunches. There are multiple games students can play with the deck; with most, students can shuffle the cards, take a predetermined number of them, then do the exercises that the cards depict.
The tool is the brainchild of Dan DeJager, physical literacy and wellness advisor at the school in Fair Oaks, California. DeJager is a self-proclaimed “gaming nerd,” and he uses the deck in conjunction with instructional videos, Zoom meetings and scavenger hunts to keep kids interested in physical education while they’re engaged in virtual learning.
“It’s a great brain break,” he said of the cards. “Even if you don’t feel like you’re working hard, just getting regular exercise can make a huge difference in your day.”

The 10 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2020

The 10 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2020

But that’s changed. With President Donald Trump trailing in national polls, Democratic challengers raking in millions and demographics shifting across the South, many of those Republican incumbents are sitting in states that don’t look as red as they used to.
Democrats need a net gain of three seats to flip the chamber if they also win the White House — since the vice president would break a tie — or four seats if Trump wins reelection. Although those net gains are possible, Democrats’ path is still complicated by the fact that they’re likely to lose a seat in Alabama, where Sen. Doug Jones tops CNN’s inaugural ranking of the 10 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2020.
Still, eight of the top 10 seats on this list are held by Republicans. That the GOP is on defense is a reflection of their success in 2014. Half of the senators on this list are Republicans who were first elected six years ago. Two others are longtime incumbents who are facing their toughest challenges yet in South Carolina and Maine.
Besides Alabama, one other Democrat-held seat comes in at the bottom: Gary Peters of Michigan is the only other Democrat running for reelection this year in a state Trump carried, albeit narrowly, in 2016. But Peters is not raising major alarm bells for national Democrats, especially in a state that looks to be moving away from Trump. It’s possible this race drops off the list in subsequent rankings.